Blackwood Hall Muffins

About the Name:

This recipe is named after the 25th Nancy Drew book, The Ghost of Blackwood Hall.  Like other books in the Nancy Drew series, there are two versions.  One was written in 1948 the other in 1967.

It has been a long time since I read either book, but a glance at the first page revealed that the two books are almost identical.  The revised version merely has some sentences removed, such as a sentence explaining that Togo was asleep.  (Notably, versions of this book call Togo a fox terrier.  In his first appearance in the The Whispering Statue he was a thoroughbred bull terrier).

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About The Recipe:

This is a recipe for blueberry muffins.

Taste: These taste great, but nothing really separates them from other blueberry muffins

Ease of Preparation: This is an easy recipe.  All you have to do is mix all the ingredients together.  Very little work.

Clarity of instructions: The instructions are almost clear.  But there are two hiccups.  The “Nancy suggests” part said to add soya flour.  I had to look it up to find out that it was an old name for soy flour.  The other hiccup is that the ingredient list calls for butter, while the instructions say to mix in shortening.  Again, a little research revealed this was not actually a mistake, but a shift in language.  Apparently, shortening can mean any oil or fat.  But I have never heard it outside the context of vegetable shortening (such as Crisco) before.

Presentation:  Not bad to look at, but nothing special.

IMG_0343

Conclusions:  A pretty easy recipe, even if there are a few outdated terms.  Since looking up the terms is fairly easy, I’m only taking off half a point for it.  I also took off a point because these lack ‘specialness’.  It’s nothing against this recipe, I just wanted room to go up for the truly spectacular ones.

Verdict:  8.5/10

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